Travel: Zanzibar day 1


After Kili, we spent three days in Zanzibar, an island state within the United Republic of Tanzania, and has its own semi-autonomous government. Zanzibar is an archipelago made up of Zanzibar and Pemba Islands, and several islets. It is characterized by beautiful sandy beaches with fringing coral reefs, and the magic of historic Stone Town – said to be the only functioning ancient town in East Africa.

DSC_0896.JPG


IMG_1858

We went to the old town after we landed.

First stop: the former Slave Market, located on the eastern side of Stone Town

DSC00154.JPG

During the reign of the Omani Arabs in the early 19th century, Zanzibar was the main slave trading point of East Africa. Slaves bought and caught on the mainland were shipped to Zanzibar, where they were re-sold and further transported to Seychelles, Mauritius, Oman and Persia. In those days, the slave market of Stone Town was easily accessible by sea, as the artificial extension of land had not occurred yet. 15 chambers under the earth were used for storing the slaves. The chambers had low ceilings and tiny windows. Sea water running through the damp rooms functioned as toilets. The slaves were chained on the bare stone, separated in male and female compartments. Many did not survive the cramped living conditions due to exhaustion and sickness.

DSC00155.JPG


DSC00156.JPG


DSC00157.JPG

In this small space 45 men fit in.

DSC00160.JPG

The Cathedral Church of Christ, also called the Cathedral of the Universities Mission in Central Africa (UMCA).

DSC00161.JPG

It stands on the site of the slave market, used in the 18th and 19th centuries when Zanzibar was a large slaving centre.
A group of UMCA missionaries had originally come to east Africa in 1861, following the call of the explorer David Livingstone to oppose the slave trade and spread Christianity across Africa. In 1864 they settled in Zanzibar, after a number of earlier sites proved unsuccessful. When the slave market was closed by Sultan Barghash in 1873 the missionaries bought the site and almost immediately started building the cathedral.

DSC_0912.JPG


DSCN0489.JPG

A memorial to the slave trade

DSC00168.JPG

depressing. i know.

DSC_0921.JPG

We went to the market next. The market is a vibrant place where everything under the sun is bought and sold. People bring their produce here from all over the island, and other people come to buy things they can’t get in their own villages.

DSC_0922.JPG


DSC00170.JPG


DSC_0926.JPG


DSCN0512.JPG

we got a bunch of spices.

DSC_0927.JPG


DSC00177.JPG

Next we went to the only open restaurant in town. Only tourists were allowed to order food because it was the muslims one-month-fasting.

DSC00187.JPG

we all had crepes. mine was filled with dal and vegetables

DSC00189.JPG

delicious! oh…. btw, I fall in love with crepes!!!! I think I ate it everyday during my stay in Zanzibar. I can’t wait to make it at home!

DSC00190.JPG

happy to find a place to eat!Ā 

IMG_1913

And then we went to Stone Town right away we arrived. Stone town is the old city and cultural heart of Zanzibar, little changed in the last 200 years. It is a place of winding alleys, bustling bazaars, mosques and grand Arab houses whose original owners vied with each other over the extravagance of their dwellings. This one-upmanship is particularly reflected in the brass-studded, carved, wooden doors – there are more than 500 different examples of this handiwork. We just spend the whole afternoonwandering through the fascinating labyrinth of narrow streets and alleyways.

DSCN0528.JPG


DSCN0529.JPG


DSC00203.JPG


DSC00181.JPG


DSC00182.JPG

DSCN0535.JPG

DSCN0536.JPG

DSCN0540.JPG


DSCN0545.JPG


DSCN0547.JPG

DSCN0551.JPG DSC00183.JPG

many girls and women dress like this

DSC00197.JPG


DSC00199.JPG

I was obsessed with the doors!

DSC_0930.JPG DSC_0933.JPG


DSC00213.JPG DSC00214.JPG


DSC00215.JPG DSC00216.JPG


DSC00222.JPG

DSC00225.JPG


DSC00228.JPG


DSC00230.JPG

Stone town is just besides this beautiful beach.

DSC00233.JPG

we then visited the Palace Museum, a large white building with castellated battlements, and was built in the late 1890’s for members of the Sultan’s family. Originally called the Sultan’s Palace, in 1911 it became the official residence of the Sultan of Zanzibar, but following the revolution in 1964, it was renamed the Peoples’ Palace. In 1994, the palace was turned into a museum dedicated to the history of Zanzibar’s Sultans which necessitated a third change of name to the Palace Museum. For the first time, visitors can see much of the Sultans’ furniture and other possessions that survived the revolution.

DSC00234.JPG


DSC00237.JPG DSC00243.JPG


DSC_0941.JPG


DSC_0942.JPG


DSC00242.JPG


DSC_0947.JPG

That was our first day in Zanzibar! It was definitely the perfect place to be after Kili! šŸ™‚

To be continued …

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under travel

2 responses to “Travel: Zanzibar day 1

  1. wow even though it is very depressing to see the tribute to the slaves, it truly is brilliantly depicted and quite a remarkable piece of art! I never would have thought about travelling to Zanzibar mostly because I know so little about it, but I am so impressed with the amount of beauty and nostalgic charm it has to offer!

    xoxo ā¤

  2. The crepe looks delicious and the photos are beautiful! That slave memorial is SO sad. That would make me feel sick to see it in person… šŸ˜¦

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s